Wildlife management

FILE - In this March 28, 2018 file photo, a North Atlantic right whale feeds on the surface of Cape Cod bay off the coast of Plymouth, Mass. Rescuers who respond to distressed whales and other marine animals say the federal government shutdown is making it more difficult to do their work. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
January 23, 2019 - 9:55 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Rescuers who respond to distressed whales and other marine animals say the federal government shutdown is making it more difficult to do their work. A network of rescue groups in the U.S. works with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to respond to marine...
Read More
January 18, 2019 - 8:57 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge has found four women guilty of entering a national wildlife refuge without a permit as they sought to place food and water in the Arizona desert for migrants. U.S. Magistrate Judge Bernardo Velasco's ruling Friday marked the first conviction against humanitarian aid...
Read More
In this Jan. 15, 2019 photo provided by Juan Oliphant, Ocean Ramsey, a shark researcher and advocate, swims with a large great white shark off the shore of Oahu. Ramsey told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 17 that images of her swimming next to a huge great white shark prove that these top predators should be protected, not feared. (Juan Oliphant via AP)
January 18, 2019 - 11:45 am
HALEIWA, Hawaii (AP) — Two shark researchers who came face to face with what could be one of the largest great whites ever recorded are using their encounter as an opportunity to push for legislation that would protect sharks in Hawaii. Ocean Ramsey, a shark researcher and conservationist, told The...
Read More
This recent photo provided by Jasmine Tool shows herself with her fiance Daniel Jastrab and their sons Jameson, right, and Silas. Tool, an ailing U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service worker in Oregon, says she can’t learn why her federally paid insurance lapsed months ago or get it reinstated because of the partial government shutdown. Tool is now scrambling to find a way to pay for nutrients that keep her alive. (Jasmine Tool via AP)
January 17, 2019 - 10:25 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — An ailing U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service worker in Oregon said she can't learn why her federally paid insurance lapsed months ago or get it reinstated because of the partial government shutdown, leaving her scrambling to find a way to pay for nutrients that keep her alive...
Read More
FILE - In this June 13, 2017, file photo, the parents of this 7-week old red wolf pup keep an eye on their offspring at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C. A pack of wild canines found frolicking near the beaches of the Texas Gulf Coast have led to the discovery that red wolves, or at least an animal closely aligned with them, are enduring in secluded parts of the Southeast nearly 40 years after the animal was thought to have become extinct in the wild. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
January 13, 2019 - 11:49 am
DALLAS (AP) — Researchers say a pack of wild canines found frolicking near the beaches of the Texas Gulf Coast carries a substantial amount of red wolf genes, a surprising discovery because the animal was declared extinct in the wild nearly 40 years ago. The finding has led wildlife biologists and...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2019, photo, the Capitol Dome is seen through a skylight in the Capitol Visitors Center in Washington. Last User: The government shutdown is in many ways wreaking havoc: Hundreds of thousands of federal employees don’t know when they’ll see their next paycheck, and low-income Americans who rely on the federal safety net worry about whether they’ll make ends meet should the stalemate in Washington carry on another month. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 12, 2019 - 4:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government shutdown is wreaking havoc on many Americans: Hundreds of thousands of federal employees don't know when they'll see their next paycheck, and low-income people who rely on the federal safety net worry about whether they'll make ends meet should the stalemate in...
Read More
FILE - In this March 14, 2018, file photo, a California sea lion peers out from a restraint nicknamed "The Squeeze" near Oregon City, Ore., as it is prepared for transport by truck to the Pacific Ocean about 130 miles away. The male sea lion was released south of Newport, Ore., in a program designed to reduce the threat to wild winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon in the Willamette River. Oregon wildlife officials have started killing sea lions that threaten a fragile run of winter steelhead in the Willamette River. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife obtained a federal permit in November to kill up to 93 California sea lions per year below Willamette Falls south of Portland, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
January 10, 2019 - 4:50 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon wildlife officials have started killing California sea lions that threaten a fragile and unique type of trout in the Willamette River, a body of water that's miles inland from the coastal areas where the massive carnivorous aquatic mammals usually congregate to feed...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2018, file photo, a sign marks a trailhead at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Broomfield, Colo., outside Denver. Activists are asking a judge to unseal documents from a 27-year-old criminal investigation into the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant outside Denver. The groups said Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 the documents could show whether the federal government did enough to clean up the site before turning part of it into a wildlife refuge and opening it to the public. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski,File)
January 10, 2019 - 3:56 pm
DENVER (AP) — Activists asked a U.S. judge Thursday to make documents public from a 27-year-old criminal investigation into a former nuclear weapons plant outside Denver with a history of fires, leaks and spills. The activists said the documents could show whether the federal government did enough...
Read More
In this Dec. 31, 2018 photo, clouds cast shadows in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Comanche County, Okla. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is directing dozens of wildlife refuges including this one to make sure hunters and others have access despite the government shutdown, according to an email obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Adam Kealoha Causey)
January 09, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is directing dozens of wildlife refuges to return staffers to work to make sure hunters and others have access despite the government shutdown, according to an email obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. The partial restaffing of 38...
Read More
Clayvin Herrera poses for a picture on the plaza of the Supreme Court, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Washington. The U.S. Supreme is reviewing a case in which Clayvin Herrera, a Crow tribal member and former tribal game warden from Montana, is asserting his right under a 150-year-old treaty with the U.S. government to hunt elk in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
January 08, 2019 - 4:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Clayvin Herrera wound up with a fine of more than $8,000 for hunting elk in Wyoming's Bighorn National Forest after he posted photos online of his kill, showing off the way showing off often happens these days. The Crow tribe member's defense, however, in a case that has gotten...
Read More

Pages