Water quality

A family stand outside their submerged huts near Nhamatanda, about 130km from Beira, in Mozambique, Tuesday, March, 26, 2019. Relief operations pressed into remote areas of central Mozambique where an unknown number of people remain without aid more than 10 days after a cyclone ripped across the country, while trucks attempted to reach the hard-hit city of Beira on a badly damaged road. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
March 26, 2019 - 9:56 am
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Cyclone-ravaged Mozambique faces a "second disaster" from cholera and other diseases, the World Health Organization warned on Tuesday, while relief operations pressed into rural areas where an unknown number of people remain without aid more than 10 days after the storm...
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March 25, 2019 - 12:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
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In this Thursday, March 14, 2019 photo, Belinda Lau, manager of the Wiki Wiki Drive Inn takeout restaurant in Honolulu, sprinkles cheese on an order of spaghetti in a styrofoam container. Hawaii would be the first state in the U.S. to ban most plastics used at restaurants under legislation that aims to cut down on waste that pollutes the ocean. Dozens of cities across the country have banned plastic foam containers, but Hawaii would be the first to bar them statewide. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)
March 19, 2019 - 12:47 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii would be the first state in the U.S. to ban most plastics at restaurants under legislation that aims to cut down on waste that pollutes the ocean. Dozens of cities nationwide have banned plastic foam containers, but Hawaii's measure targeting fast-food and full-service...
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FILE – In this July 12, 2011, file photo, two rowers paddle along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
March 19, 2019 - 6:20 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in an Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., left, shakes hands as she arrives at a campaign meet-and-greet at To Share Brewing, Friday, March 15, 2019, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
March 15, 2019 - 5:53 pm
MERRIMACK, N.H. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopeful Kirsten Gillibrand is trying to connect with voters' important issues on the ground — or, in some cases, underground. The U.S. senator from New York held two roundtable discussions Friday in New Hampshire communities struggling with...
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FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 4, 2017 file photo, pyres of ivory are set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
March 13, 2019 - 5:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
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Wells Fargo CEO Timothy Sloan is questioned by the House Financial Services Committee about revelations the bank had created millions of fake bank accounts to reach their financial goals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 12, 2019 - 11:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEO of beleaguered Wells Fargo told Congress Tuesday that the bank has cleaned up its act after a series of scandals that affected millions of customers. But Democrats — and some Republicans — on the House Financial Services Committee didn't seem to be buying it. Wells Fargo...
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FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, image shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. After excavating thousands of tons of soil and treating millions of gallons of water, New Mexico regulators say the U.S. Air Force still has work to do to clean up the contamination. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
March 11, 2019 - 3:13 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Air Force has excavated thousands of tons of soil and treated millions of gallons of water contaminated by jet fuel at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city, but state regulators say the military still has more cleanup to do. The New Mexico environment...
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Rep. Harley Rouda, D-Calif., speaks during a House Oversight and Reform subcommittee hearing on PFAS chemicals and their risks on Wednesday, March 6, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
March 06, 2019 - 1:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cleaning up and protecting U.S. drinking water from a class of toxic chemicals used in many household items could cost in the tens of billions of dollars nationally, including $2 billion for the Department of Defense alone, witnesses testified Wednesday before a House panel urging...
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FILE - In this Dec. 11, 2018 file photo, Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler at EPA headquarters in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
February 28, 2019 - 2:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed former coal industry lobbyist Andrew Wheeler to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, despite concerns by Democrats and one Republican about regulatory rollbacks he's made in eight months as the agency's acting chief. Senators voted 52-47 to...
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