Water pollution

FILE - In this June 3, 2019 file photo, protesters with Stand.earth hold a banner in opposition to Carnival Corp. outside of federal court, in Miami. Top Carnival Corp. executives are due back in court to explain what the world's largest cruise line is doing to reduce ocean pollution. A hearing is set Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Miami federal court for an update on what steps Carnival is taking. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
October 01, 2019 - 10:55 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Top Carnival Corp. executives are due back in court to explain what the world's largest cruise line is doing to reduce ocean pollution. A hearing is set Wednesday in Miami federal court for an update on what steps Carnival is taking. Chairman Micky Arison, who also owns the Miami Heat...
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September 26, 2019 - 10:09 am
California is failing to protect its waters from pollution, partly because of a worsening problem with homelessness in large cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler outlined a series of alleged...
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FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 2:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Climate change is making the world's oceans warm, rise, lose oxygen and get more acidic at an ever-faster pace, while melting even more ice and snow, a grim international science assessment concludes. But that's nothing compared to what Wednesday's special United Nations-affiliated...
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FILE - This Sept. 4, 2017, aerial file photo shows Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant reactors, bottom from right, Unit 1, Unit 2 and Unit 3, in Okuma town, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. The utility company operating Fukushima's tsunami-wrecked nuclear power plant said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019 it will run out of space for tanks to store massive amounts of treated but still contaminated water in three years, adding pressure for the government and the public to reach consensus on what to do with the water. (Daisuke Suzuki/Kyodo News via AP, File)
August 09, 2019 - 5:26 am
TOKYO (AP) — The utility company operating Fukushima's tsunami-devastated nuclear power plant says it will run out of space to store massive amounts of contaminated water in three years, adding pressure on the government and the public to reach a consensus on what to do with it. Three reactors at...
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July 29, 2019 - 9:07 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region Monday urged the candidates in next year's presidential election to support a plan for safeguarding their shared waters by boosting federal spending on treatment plants and environmental cleanups. Led by...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 12, 2019 - 9:31 pm
Tropical Storm Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 12, 2019 - 9:28 pm
Tropical Storm Barry could harm the Gulf coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it's hard to predict how severe the damage will be. That's because three distinct factors are coming together at once. The storm is expected to create a surge of up to 3 feet (1 meter) and bring...
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Water flows through Conowingo Dam, a hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River near Conowingo, Md., on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Officials once counted on the dam to block large amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna from reaching Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, but the reservoir behind the dam has filled with sediment far sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
July 06, 2019 - 7:00 am
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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In this June 3, 2017 photo, Dr. Joan Perry of Kinston, left, answers a question during a debate with and state Rep. Greg Murphy, a Greenville physician, in Greenville, N.C. The two Republicans are running in a special primary election to be held July 9 for North Carolina's 3rd Congressional seat. (Deborah Griffin/The Daily Reflector via AP)
July 06, 2019 - 6:53 am
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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Johnny Rowan stands outside Burning River Coffee, Friday, June 14, 2019, in Lakewood, Ohio. Rowan’s is one of 90 active businesses registered with the state that have “burning river” in their names, inspired by the Cuyahoga River’s most famous fire. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
June 18, 2019 - 7:43 am
CLEVELAND (AP) — Fifty years after the Cuyahoga River's most infamous fire helped spawn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, artists and entrepreneurs have turned old jokes into inspiration and forged decades of embarrassment into a fiery brand of Cleveland pride. "Everybody knows Cuyahoga...
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