Violations of environmental law

People visit a memorial garden for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019, in Las Vegas. Two years after a shooter rained gunfire on country music fans from a high-rise Las Vegas hotel, MGM Resorts International reached a settlement that could pay up to $800 million to families of the 58 people who died and hundreds of others who were injured, attorneys said Thursday. (AP Photo/John Locher)
October 04, 2019 - 7:45 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — They may have been united by a love for country music, but the people gunned down two years ago at a Las Vegas concert will not be seen as equals when up to $800 million is paid out from a legal settlement. The administrator overseeing the process will have the icy task of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, windows are broken at the Mandalay Bay resort and casino in Las Vegas, the room from where Stephen Craig Paddock fired on a nearby music festival, killing 58 and injuring hundreds on Oct. 1. In the two years since the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, the federal government and states have taken some action to tighten gun regulations. But advocates say they're frustrated more hasn't been done since the attack in Las Vegas killed 58 people on Oct. 1, 2017, and that mass shootings keep happening across the country. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
October 03, 2019 - 11:02 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Two years after a shooter rained gunfire on country music fans from a high-rise Las Vegas hotel, MGM Resorts International reached a settlement that could pay up to $800 million to families of the 58 people who died and hundreds of others who were injured, attorneys announced...
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FILE - This Dec. 28, 2016, file photo shows the two buttes that make up the namesake for Utah's Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah. A federal judge has rejected the Trump administration's bid to dismiss lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of a 2017 decision to downsize two sprawling national monuments in Utah. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
October 01, 2019 - 1:47 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A federal judge has rejected the Trump administration's bid to dismiss lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of a 2017 decision to downsize two sprawling national monuments in Utah. U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan's written decisions issued Monday night means the...
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September 26, 2019 - 4:51 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — People who rely on wood stoves to heat their homes in the winter are scrambling to find other options after a U.S. District Court halted tree cutting on large swaths of national forests in the Southwest over concern about a threatened owl. "We have some elderly people that...
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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump signs an executive order on the Keystone XL pipeline in the Oval Office of the White House. Native American tribes in Montana and South Dakota say the Trump administration unlawfully approved the oil pipeline without considering potential damage to cultural sites. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
September 10, 2019 - 10:57 am
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Attorneys for the Trump administration want a U.S. judge to throw out a lawsuit from Native American tribes trying to block the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada to Nebraska. Tribes in Montana and South Dakota say President Donald Trump approved the pipeline...
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Carnival Corp. President Arnold Donald, left, arrives at federal court, Monday, June 3, 2019, in Miami. Carnival Corp. is in federal court for a hearing on what to do about allegations that it has continued polluting the oceans from some of its cruise ships despite agreeing years ago to stop (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
June 03, 2019 - 3:24 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Carnival Corp. reached a settlement Monday with federal prosecutors in which the world's largest cruise line agreed to pay a $20 million penalty because its ships continued to pollute the oceans despite a previous criminal conviction aimed at curbing similar conduct. Senior U.S...
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April 11, 2019 - 4:18 am
MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge has threatened to temporarily block Carnival Corp. from docking cruise ships at ports in the United States as punishment for a possible probation violation. The Miami Herald reports U.S. District Judge Patricia Seitz said Wednesday that she'll make a decision in June,...
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President Donald Trump visits a new section of the border wall with Mexico in Calexico, Calif., Friday April 5, 2019. Gloria Chavez with the U.S. Border Patrol, center, and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen listen (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
April 05, 2019 - 8:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump and the border (all times local): 11:25 p.m. President Donald Trump has made a dramatic appearance at his privately owned golf club in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. Trump landed in Marine One, making an unannounced visit to his Trump...
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This Jan. 12, 2012 photo shows U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason at a conference in Anchorage, Alaska. The Trump administration has suffered a pair of setbacks in attempting to reverse environmental policies set for Alaska by former President Barack Obama. Gleason on Friday, March 29, 2019 ruled that the Trump administration violated federal law with a proposed road through a national wildlife refuge. Hours later, Gleason ruled that Trump exceeded his authority by reversing a ban on offshore drilling in most of the Arctic Ocean and parts of the Atlantic (Erik Hill/Anchorage Daily News via AP)
April 01, 2019 - 3:59 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to reverse environmental initiatives in Alaska put in place by his predecessor, Barack Obama, took a hit with two rulings in federal court. U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason on Friday ruled that the administration violated federal law...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads a haul truck with coal at the Spring Creek coal mine near Decker, Mont. A judge says U.S. officials should reconsider the climate change effects of expanding the mine. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
February 12, 2019 - 4:06 pm
BILLLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials have again been faulted by a federal judge for failing to adequately consider the potential climate change effects of expanding a massive coal mine in the sagebrush-covered hills of southeastern Montana. U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Cavan recommended in a...
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