Tropical storms

A man tries to bike through the flooding from the rains of storm Barry on LA Hwy 675 in New Iberia, La., Sunday, July 14, 2019. Tropical Depression Barry dumped rain as it slowly swept inland through Gulf Coast states Sunday. (Henrietta Wildsmith/The Shreveport Times via AP)
July 14, 2019 - 10:21 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Even though Tropical Depression Barry did not unleash catastrophic flooding in Louisiana, many across the Gulf Coast were urged to take heed of tornado and flash-flood warnings Monday as the storm moved north. Barry was downgraded from a tropical storm on Sunday afternoon but...
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A man tries to bike through the flooding from the rains of storm Barry on LA Hwy 675 in New Iberia, La., Sunday, July 14, 2019. Tropical Depression Barry dumped rain as it slowly swept inland through Gulf Coast states Sunday. (Henrietta Wildsmith/The Shreveport Times via AP)
July 14, 2019 - 10:18 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Even though Tropical Depression Barry did not unleash catastrophic flooding in Louisiana, many across the Gulf Coast were urged to take heed of tornado and flash-flood warnings Monday as the storm moved north. Barry was downgraded from a tropical storm on Sunday afternoon but...
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Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday, July 13, 2019, in Mandeville, La. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 10:08 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Weakened but still potent, Barry inundated the Gulf Coast but appeared unlikely to deluge New Orleans as it continued its slow advance. Still, Gov. John Bel Edwards on Saturday night urged residents across south Louisiana to stay "vigilant," warning that Barry could still cause...
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Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday, July 13, 2019, in Mandeville, La. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 10:05 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Weakened but still potent, Barry inundated the Gulf Coast but appeared unlikely to deluge New Orleans as it continued its slow advance. Still, Gov. John Bel Edwards on Saturday night urged residents across south Louisiana to stay "vigilant," warning that Barry could still cause...
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A public works dump truck blocks the Morgan City, La., access to the Long-Allen Bridge in the background, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry, Saturday, July 13, 2019. High buffeting winds are sweeping the truss bridge that crosses over the Atchafalaya River between the communities of Berwick and Morgan City. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
July 13, 2019 - 6:52 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Latest on Tropical Storm Barry (all times local): 8:05 a.m. National Hurricane Center director Ken Graham said Tropical Storm Barry is gathering "a big slough of moisture" just off the central Louisiana coast and is taking its time to come ashore Saturday morning, meaning "a...
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The Mississippi River is at 16 feet, which is just below flood stage, 17 feet, in New Orleans, Thursday, July 11, 2019 ahead of Tropical Storm Barry from the Gulf of Mexico. The river levees protect to about 20 feet, which the river may reach if predicted storm surge prevents the river from flowing into the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 13, 2019 - 4:09 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — When it comes to water, New Orleans faces three threats: the sea, the sky and the river. Tropical storms and hurricanes send storm surges pushing up against the city's outer defenses. That's what happened in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina's surge caused widespread levee failures and...
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Alan and Dot Richardson, from England, wear ponchos as they walk along Bourbon Street in the French Quarter Friday, July 12, 2019, in New Orleans, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. The National Weather Service in New Orleans says water is already starting to cover some low lying roads as Tropical Storm Barry approaches the state from the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 1:42 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — People boarded up buildings, stocked up on water and braced for torrents of rain and punishing wind from a strengthening Tropical Storm Barry that threatened millions as it churned a path ashore and tested efforts to guard against flooding since Hurricane Katrina devastated New...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 12, 2019 - 9:31 pm
Tropical Storm Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 12, 2019 - 9:28 pm
Tropical Storm Barry could harm the Gulf coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it's hard to predict how severe the damage will be. That's because three distinct factors are coming together at once. The storm is expected to create a surge of up to 3 feet (1 meter) and bring...
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People walk past Brennan's restaurant in the French Quarter with sandbags on the front door as bands of rain from Tropical Storm Barry from the Gulf of Mexico move into New Orleans, La., Friday, July 12, 2019. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 12, 2019 - 1:41 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Go or stay? It is a question people in and around New Orleans ask themselves every time a threatening storm lurks in the Gulf of Mexico. They asked it before Katrina, a major 2005 hurricane that devastated the area when levees failed. And they're asking it again with Tropical...
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