Tribal governments

FILE - In this April 27, 2019 file photo, dancers enter at the Gathering of Nations, one of the world's largest gatherings of indigenous people in Albuquerque, N.M. A handful of states, including New Mexico and Maine, are celebrating their first Indigenous Peoples' Day as part of a trend to move away from a day honoring Christopher Columbus. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)
October 14, 2019 - 5:05 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A handful of states are celebrating their first Indigenous Peoples Day on Monday as part of a trend to move away from a day honoring Christopher Columbus. From Minnesota to Vermont, at least five states and Washington, D.C., have done away with Columbus Day celebrations in...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Local government lawsuits against the family that owns Purdue Pharma should be allowed to proceed even as the company attempts to reach a nationwide settlement in bankruptcy court over the toll of the opioids crisis, according to a court filing on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 08, 2019 - 1:19 pm
Arizona's attorney general is having misgivings about agreeing to Purdue Pharma's proposal to settle litigation over the opioid crisis. Attorney General Mark Brnovich, a Republican, said in a court filing late Monday that the OxyContin maker has "sought to undermine material terms of the deal." He...
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October 01, 2019 - 7:07 pm
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — The British government is expressing "regret" that British explorers killed some of the first indigenous Maori they met 250 years ago, but has stopped short of issuing a full apology. British High Commissioner Laura Clarke is scheduled to meet Wednesday with Maori...
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FILE - This Jan. 11, 2018 file photo shows Judge Dan Polster in his office, in Cleveland. Attorneys representing eight drug distributors, pharmacies and retailers facing trial for their roles in the national opioid crisis are seeking to disqualify the federal judge overseeing their cases saying he’s shown clear bias in his efforts to obtain a multi-billion dollar global settlement. The motion was filed late Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, in U.S. District Court in Cleveland, where Judge Dan Polster presides over most of the 2,000 lawsuits filed by state, local and tribal governments. Polster has not responded. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
September 14, 2019 - 1:27 pm
CLEVELAND (AP) — Attorneys for eight drug distributors, pharmacies and retailers facing trial next month for their roles in the opioid crisis want to disqualify the federal judge overseeing their cases, saying he has shown bias in his effort to obtain a multibillion-dollar global settlement...
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September 01, 2019 - 5:48 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Upcoming trials seen as test cases for forcing drugmakers to pay for societal damage inflicted by the opioid epidemic should be delayed until Ohio's own lawsuits against the drugmakers can be heard, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost argued in a lawsuit. Yost, a Republican, said...
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In this June 25, 2019, photo, Marcella LeBeau, of the Two Kettles Band of the Lakotae, is photographed on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn’t happen enough: Court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they’ll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native American activist Frank LaMere, who died in June. LeBeau, a 99-year-old registered Democrat, said that’s a change from the past when politicians largely overlooked Native issues. “We’re like a third-world country,” she said. “No one really listens to us.” (AP Photo/Kali Robinson)
August 16, 2019 - 9:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Iowa next week to do something that Native Americans say doesn't happen enough: court their vote. At least seven White House hopefuls have said they'll attend a forum in Sioux City on Monday and Tuesday named for longtime Native...
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August 13, 2019 - 5:05 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A judge barred the Trump administration on Tuesday from acting on the recommendations of an energy advisory panel that was created to make it easier to extract fossil fuels from public lands and waters. U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy sided with a Montana-based conservation...
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Security forces inspect the site of a deadly attack in Aden, Yemen, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. Yemen's rebels fired a ballistic missile at a military parade Thursday in the southern port city of Aden as coordinated suicide bombings targeted a police station in another part of the city. The attacks killed over 50 people and wounded dozens. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
August 02, 2019 - 1:15 am
SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Yemeni officials and tribal leaders say al-Qaida militants targeted a military camp in southern Abyan province, killing at least 20 troops. The militants attacked the camp with rocket propelled grenades and automatic rifles around midnight, setting off clashes that lasted until...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 21, 2019 - 9:08 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Government hospitals placed Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit released Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of Health...
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In this Tuesday, July 16, 2019, drone photo released by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power, Gov. Mike Dunleavy, center rear, poses for photos in front of a Riv-Gen Power System turbine on the bank of the Kvichak River in Igiugig, Alaska. A tiny Alaska Native village is adopting an emerging technology to transform the power of a local river into a renewable energy source. (Amanda Byrd/ University Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 3:24 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A tiny Native village in southwest Alaska has turned to an emerging technology to transform the power of a local river into a sustainable energy source that's expected to free residents from dependency on costly diesel fuel. The village council in Igiugig is the first...
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