State governments

October 07, 2019 - 6:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says it won't review the case of an Alabama death row inmate who argued his sentence is unconstitutional because a judge imposed it over the will of a jury. The high court said Monday it won't hear Mario Dion Woodward's case. Woodward was convicted of fatally...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2011 file photo, James Kraig Kahler, who was convicted of capital murder in the fatal shooting of his estranged wife, their two teenage daughters and his wife's grandmother, looks into the spectators gallery in Osage County District Court in Lyndon, Kan., during a break in his sentencing hearing. The U.S. Supreme Court is preparing to consider whether Kansas is improperly denying criminal defendants the right to an insanity defense is it takes up an appeal from Kahler who was sentenced to die for the killings. (Thad Allton/The Topeka Capital-Journal via AP, File)
October 06, 2019 - 7:13 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court is preparing to consider how far states can go toward eliminating the insanity defense in criminal trials as it reviews the case of a Kansas man sentenced to die for killing four relatives. The high court planned to hear arguments Monday in James Kraig...
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FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014, file photo, a patron exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at a store in New York. Only two years ago e-cigarettes were viewed as holding great potential for public health: offering a way to wean smokers off traditional cigarettes. But now Juul and other vaping companies face an escalating backlash that threatens to sweep their products off the market. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 05, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Only two years ago, electronic cigarettes were viewed as a small industry with big potential to improve public health by offering a path to steer millions of smokers away from deadly cigarettes. That promise led U.S. regulators to take a hands-off approach to e-cigarette makers,...
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State District Judge Tammy Kemp opens a Bible to John 3:16 before giving it to former Dallas Police Officer Amber Guyger, left, before Guyger left for jail, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Dallas. Guyger, who said she mistook neighbor Botham Jean's apartment for her own and fatally shot him in his living room, was sentenced to a decade in prison. (Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool)
October 03, 2019 - 2:38 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Judges don’t usually hug convicted murderers in the courtroom or hand them Bibles before sending them off to prison. That is what made Judge Tammy Kemp’s actions so extraordinary in the closing moments of the trial of a white former Dallas police officer who fatally shot her black...
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This image taken from video provided by National Transportation Safety Board shows damage from a World War II-era B-17 bomber plane that crashed Wednesday at Bradley International Airport, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019 in Windsor Locks, Conn. The plane crashed and burned after experiencing mechanical trouble on takeoff Wednesday morning from Bradley International Airport. (NTSB via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 1:49 pm
WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. (AP) — The Latest on the crash of a World War II-era bomber in Connecticut (all times local): 4:50 p.m. An official with the National Transportation Safety Board says the pilot in a deadly Connecticut plane crash had more than 7,000 hours’ experience flying B-17s. The pilot,...
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In this aerial image taken from video, emergency crews respond to where a World War II-era bomber B-17 plane crashed at Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Conn., Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (WFXT Boston 25 News via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 6:39 am
WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. (AP) — A former police officer and an insurance analyst were among the seven people killed in the crash of a B-17 bomber at a Connecticut airport. State officials said Thursday that Gary Mazzone (muh-ZOHN’) died in the crash the day before of the World War II-era plane at...
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Connecticut State Police stand outside the area of the wreckage of a World War II-era B-17 bomber plane that crashed at Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Conn., Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
October 02, 2019 - 11:52 am
WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. (AP) — The Latest on a World War II-era bomber plane crashing outside of Bradley International Airport (all times local): 2:50 p.m. Bradley International Airport has reopened one runway after a World War II-era bomber crashed during an aborted takeoff attempt. The Connecticut...
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October 01, 2019 - 6:52 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A U.S. judge on Tuesday temporarily blocked a California law aimed at forcing President Donald Trump to release his personal income tax returns in order to appear on the 2020 primary ballot. U.S. District Judge Morrison C. England Jr. issued a written opinion saying the...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Missouri Department of Corrections shows Russell Bucklew. Bucklew is scheduled to die by injection Oct. 1, 2019 for killing a southeast Missouri man during a violent crime rampage in 1996. Bucklew suffers from a rare medical condition that causes blood-filled tumors in his head, neck and throat, and he had a tracheostomy tube inserted in 2018. His attorneys say he faces the risk of a "grotesque execution process." Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, who is considering clemency in the execution for tomorrow. (Missouri Department of Corrections via AP File)
October 01, 2019 - 4:53 pm
BONNE TERRE, Mo. (AP) — The Latest on the execution of Russell Bucklew in Missouri (all times local): 6:48 p.m. A Missouri man has been executed for killing a man during a violent 1996 crime spree, despite concerns that the inmate's rare medical condition would cause a gruesome lethal injection...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2013, file photo, an athlete jumps near the NCAA logo during practice for a second-round game of the NCAA college basketball tournament in Austin, Texas. Defying the NCAA, California's governor signed a first-in-the-nation law Monday, Sept. 30, that will let college athletes hire agents and make money from endorsements — a move that could upend amateur sports in the U.S. and trigger a legal challenge. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
September 30, 2019 - 2:45 pm
The NCAA and the billion-dollar enterprise that is big-time college sports have been facing targeted attacks on amateurism rules for more than a decade. Each one threatened to bring down the governing body and fundamentally change college sports forever. The NCAA has lost court cases, made...
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