Space industry

This Oct. 12, 2019 photo made available by NASA shows the comet 2I/Borisov, seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. It’s the second known interstellar visitor to swoop through our backyard. An amateur astronomer from Crimea, Gennady Borisov, discovered the comet in August, two years after the first alien guest, a cigar-shaped rock, popped up. (NASA, ESA, D. Jewitt (UCLA) via AP)
October 16, 2019 - 11:15 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the best pictures yet of our newest interstellar visitor. This comet from outside our solar system is zooming by us at a blistering 110,000 mph (177,000 kph). Hubble caught some glam shots over the weekend from a distance of 260...
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FILE - In this March 26, 1965 file photo, Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, who stepped into space from the Voskod-2 spaceship, speaks in Moscow, Russia. Alexei Leonov, the first human to walk in space, died in Moscow on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. He was 85. (AP Photo, File)
October 11, 2019 - 8:05 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Alexei Leonov, the legendary Soviet cosmonaut who became the first human to walk in space 54 years ago — and nearly didn't make it back into his capsule — has died in Moscow. He was 85. Russian space agency Roscosmos made the announcement on its website on Friday, without providing a...
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NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, left, talks with SpaceX chief engineer Elon Musk, right, in front of the Crew Dragon spacecraft, about the progress to fly astronauts to and from the International Space Station, from American soil, as part of the agency's commercial crew program at SpaceX headquarters, in Hawthorne, Calif., Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)
October 10, 2019 - 4:52 pm
HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) — NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine says a Twitter statement critical of SpaceX was a signal to all of the space agency's contractors that more realism needs to be built into development timelines. Bridenstine addressed the issue Thursday at a news conference after touring...
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FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2018 file photo, Virgin Galactic aircraftVSS Unity reaches space for the first time during its fourth powered flight from Mojave Air and Space Port, Calif. Boeing plans to invest $20 million in Virgin Galactic as the space tourism company nears its goal of launching passengers on suborbital flights. The companies announced the investment Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, saying they will work together on broadening commercial access to space and transforming global travel technologies. Virgin Galactic has conducted successful test flights of its winged rocket ship at Mojave, California, and is preparing to begin operations at Spaceport America in New Mexico. (AP Photo/Matt Hartman, File)
October 08, 2019 - 4:47 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Boeing plans to invest $20 million in Virgin Galactic, looking at possibilities beyond the space tourism company's immediate goal of launching passengers on suborbital flights as early as next year. The companies announced the investment Tuesday, saying they will work together on...
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October 06, 2019 - 4:49 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Astronauts are kicking off the first of five spacewalks to replace old batteries at the International Space Station. Christina Koch (Cook) and Andrew Morgan ventured out Sunday. They will remove a pair of old batteries and install a new one delivered just a week ago...
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In this photo provided by the Museum of the Bible, a photo of the Lunar Bible on display at the museum is pictured in an undated photo. The Museum of the Bible in Washington has quietly replaced an artifact purported to be one of a handful of miniature Bibles that a NASA astronaut carried to the moon in 1971 after an expert questioned its authenticity. (Museum of the Bible Collection via AP)
October 05, 2019 - 6:34 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Museum of the Bible in Washington quietly replaced an artifact purported to be one of a handful of miniature Bibles that a NASA astronaut carried to the moon in 1971 after an expert questioned its authenticity. The move follows an announcement last year that at least five...
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In this image released Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, by NASA, astronauts Christina Koch, right, and, Jessica Meir pose on the International Space Station. The first all-female spacewalk is back on, six months after a flap over spacesuits led to an embarrassing cancellation. NASA announced Friday that the two U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station will pair up for a spacewalk later this month. (NASA via AP)
October 04, 2019 - 7:20 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The first all-female spacewalk is back on, six months after a suit-sizing flap led to an embarrassing cancellation. NASA announced Friday that the International Space Station's two women will pair up for a spacewalk later this month. Astronauts Christina Koch and the...
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September 28, 2019 - 7:29 pm
BOCA CHICA VILLAGE, Texas (AP) — Elon Musk has unveiled a SpaceX spacecraft designed to carry a crew and cargo to the moon, Mars or anywhere else in the solar system and land back on Earth perpendicularly. In a livestreamed speech from SpaceX's launch facility near the southern tip of Texas, Musk...
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The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-15 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, flies in clouds at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Jessica Meir, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, and United Arab Emirates astronaut Hazza Almansouri. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)
September 25, 2019 - 7:28 am
BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan (AP) — A multinational crew made up of an American, a Russian and the first space traveler from the United Arab Emirates blasted off successfully on Wednesday for a mission on the International Space Station. A Russian Soyuz rocket lifted off as scheduled at 6:57 p.m. (1357 GMT...
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NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine attends a press conference at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) headquarters in Tokyo Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Bridenstine said space security is necessary so that the United States, Japan and other allies can safely explore the moon and Mars explorations. Bridenstine said NASA said that gadgets using the space technology have become indispensable part of the people’s lives and its safety must be preserved. (AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi)
September 24, 2019 - 11:24 pm
TOKYO (AP) — The head of NASA said Wednesday that space security is necessary so that the United States, Japan and others can safely explore the moon and Mars. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine also said during his Tokyo visit that he wants to take the U.S. space partnership with Japan to a new...
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