Smoking

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014, file photo, a patron exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at a store in New York. Only two years ago e-cigarettes were viewed as holding great potential for public health: offering a way to wean smokers off traditional cigarettes. But now Juul and other vaping companies face an escalating backlash that threatens to sweep their products off the market. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 05, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Only two years ago, electronic cigarettes were viewed as a small industry with big potential to improve public health by offering a path to steer millions of smokers away from deadly cigarettes. That promise led U.S. regulators to take a hands-off approach to e-cigarette makers,...
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President Donald Trump talks about a plan to ban most flavored e-cigarettes, in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, in Washington. From left, acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless, first lady Melania Trump, Trump, and Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 11, 2019 - 2:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government will act to ban thousands of flavors used in e-cigarettes, President Donald Trump said Wednesday, responding to a recent surge in underage vaping that has alarmed parents, politicians and health authorities nationwide. The surprise White House announcement...
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FILE - In this March 18, 2019, file photo, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer listens to Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., in Clawson, Mich. Whitmer is moving to make Michigan the first state to ban flavored e-cigarettes. The Democrat announced Wednesday, Sept. 4 that she ordered the state health department to issue emergency rules. They will prohibit the sale and misleading marketing of flavored nicotine vaping products. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
September 04, 2019 - 9:36 am
LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer moved Wednesday to make her state the first to ban flavored electronic cigarettes, accusing companies of using candy flavors and deceptive advertising to "hook children on nicotine." The Democrat ordered the state health department to issue...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, JUUL Labs co-founder and Chief Product Officer James Monsees testifies before a House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Juul Labs is facing mounting scrutiny from state law enforcement officials, with the attorneys general in Illinois and the District of Columbia investigating how the company’s blockbuster vaping device became so popular with underage teens. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 30, 2019 - 10:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — E-cigarette giant Juul Labs is facing mounting scrutiny from state law enforcement officials, with the attorneys general in Illinois and the District of Columbia investigating how the company's blockbuster vaping device became so popular with underage teens, The Associated Press...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 file photo, test cigarettes burn in a smoking machine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. A decade after President Barack Obama signed the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act into law in 2009, health advocates say the Food and Drug Administration has yet to put in place the most sweeping changes envisioned by Congress. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)
August 29, 2019 - 8:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — It seemed like a new era in the half-century battle against the deadly toll of tobacco: U.S. health officials for the first time would begin regulating cigarettes, chew and other products responsible for a half-million American deaths annually. "The decades-long effort to protect...
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CBS
August 19, 2019 - 12:54 pm
"It felt like I was genuinely having a heart attack," said 18-year-old Chance Ammirata, who was describing the feeling when his medical emergency began about three weeks ago. "I would say my chest felt like it was collapsing and tightening up and I couldn't breathe." Emergency room doctors told him...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, JUUL Labs co-founder and Chief Product Officer James Monsees testifies before a House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Juul Labs gave nearly $100,000 to members of Congress during the first half of 2019 as the company faced the bulk of the blame for a surge of underage vaping and calls for tighter government regulation of the industry.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 02, 2019 - 8:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — E-cigarette giant Juul Labs gave nearly $100,000 to members of Congress during the first half of 2019 as the company faced the bulk of the blame for a surge of underage vaping and calls for tighter government regulation of the industry. The donations from Juul's political action...
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August 01, 2019 - 1:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — E-cigarette giant Juul Labs gave nearly $100,000 to members of Congress during the first half of 2019 as the company faced the bulk of the blame for a surge of underage vaping and calls for tighter government regulation of the industry. The donations from Juul's political action...
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July 31, 2019 - 1:57 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut launched an investigation Wednesday into the marketing practices of Juul Labs, becoming the latest state to probe the vaping product manufacturer's health claims and appeal to young people. State Attorney General William Tong said his probe is part of a national...
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This photo taken Monday, May 13, 2019, shows Karen Guttensen and Ingvar Ingolfsson, right, both 14-years old, outside the Tjornin youth center in Reykjavik, Iceland, on a bright summer night. The island nation in the North Atlantic has dried up a teenage culture of drinking and smoking by focusing on local participation in music and sports options for students, with such success that Icelandic teens now have one of the lowest rates of substance abuse in Europe. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
July 31, 2019 - 6:45 am
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — The clock strikes 10 p.m. on a Friday night when the "Parent Patrol" enters a popular playground in suburban Reykjavik. The teens turn down the music and reach for their phones to check the time: It's ticking into curfew. Every weekend, parents all over the Icelandic...
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