Materials industry

In this Aug. 5, 2018, photo, students sit in front of building that houses the headquarters of Sinarmas Group, one of Indonesia's largest palm oil company, in Jakarta, Indonesia. The main global group for certifying sustainable wood has suspended plans to give its influential endorsement to Indonesian paper giant Sinarmas after revelations it cut down tropical forests and used an opaque corporate structure to hide its activities. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
August 16, 2018 - 8:53 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The main global group for certifying sustainable wood has suspended plans to give its influential endorsement to Indonesian paper giant Sinarmas after revelations it cut down tropical forests and used an opaque corporate structure to hide its activities. The Forest...
Read More
A worker inspecst the the area around the collapsed Morandi highway bridge, in Genoa, northern Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018. A bridge on a main highway linking Italy with France collapsed in the Italian port city of Genoa during a sudden, violent storm, sending vehicles plunging 90 meters (nearly 300 feet) into a heap of rubble below. (AP Photo/Nicola Marfisi)
August 16, 2018 - 7:43 am
MILAN (AP) — The latest developments following the deadly collapse of a highway bridge in Italy (all times local): 4:40 p.m. Italian authorities have lowered the confirmed death toll in Genoa's bridge collapse to 38 from 39. Genoa Prefect Office official Raffaella Corsaro told The AP on Thursday...
Read More
In this Aug. 1, 2018 photo, Lauren Woehr hands her 16-month-old daughter Caroline, held by her husband Dan McDowell, a cup filled with bottled water at their home in Horsham, Pa. In Horsham and surrounding towns in eastern Pennsylvania, and at other sites around the United States, the foams once used routinely in firefighting training at military bases contained per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. EPA testing between 2013 and 2015 found significant amounts of PFAS in public water supplies in 33 U.S. states. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
August 13, 2018 - 5:28 am
HORSHAM, Pa. (AP) — Lauren Woeher wonders if her 16-month-old daughter has been harmed by tap water contaminated with toxic industrial compounds used in products like nonstick cookware, carpets and fast-food wrappers. Henry Betz, at 76, rattles around his house alone at night, thinking about the...
Read More
August 10, 2018 - 12:08 pm
Bank of the West's decision to divest from certain fossil fuel investments has run headlong into threats of retaliation in states that get much of their revenue from coal, oil and natural gas extraction. The San Francisco-based bank recently announced that it would be "investing where we feel we...
Read More
August 09, 2018 - 7:12 pm
CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A Canadian gold mining firm has won the right to go after Venezuela's U.S.-based oil refineries to collect $1.4 billion that it lost in a take-over by the late-President Hugo Chavez. Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark of the U.S. Federal District Court in Delaware made the...
Read More
FILE - In this May 16, 2018 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. A federal appeals court has ruled that the Trump administration endangered public health by keeping a top-selling pesticide chlorpyrifos on the market, despite extensive scientific evidence that even tiny levels of exposure could harm babies’ brains. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco has ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to remove chlorpyrifos from sale in the United States within 60 days. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 09, 2018 - 1:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration endangered public health by keeping a widely used pesticide on the market despite extensive scientific evidence that even tiny levels of exposure can harm babies' brains. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in...
Read More
In this July 25, 2018, photo, Stephen Bell, president and CEO of the Arkadelphia Area Chamber of Commerce, talks about a new railroad spur that is being built to support the needs of what he hopes will be a new paper mill, one of several Chinese-backed deals Arkansas has landed in recent years, in Arkadelphia, Ark. State and local officials in Arkansas are scrambling to preserve development deals with Chinese companies amid President Donald Trump's escalating tariff battle. "It's like a dark cloud hanging over the future of the project," Bell said. "Right now, the clouds are off on the horizon. But I think no one knows where the trade situation is going right now." (AP Photo/Karen E. Segrave)
August 08, 2018 - 8:28 am
ARKADELPHIA, Ark. (AP) — A Chinese company's announcement two years ago that it would spend more than $1 billion and hire hundreds of workers for a paper mill on the outskirts of this rural college town was seen as a much-needed shot in the arm for the region's economy. A web video promoting...
Read More
August 03, 2018 - 12:52 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — The North American subsidiary of a French chemical manufacturer and two senior staff members were indicted Friday in connection with last year's explosion at the Crosby, Texas, plant in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Arkema North America, its CEO Richard Rowe and plant manager Leslie...
Read More
FILE - In this April 11, 2018, file photo, production workers stack newspapers onto a cart at the Janesville Gazette Printing & Distribution plant in Janesville, Wis. The U.S. Commerce Department is going ahead with a tax on Canadian newsprint, a threat to the already-struggling American newspaper industry. The tariffs unveiled Thursday, Aug. 2, are mostly lower than those originally announced earlier this year but would still impose an anti-dumping border tax as high as 16.88 percent. (Angela Major/The Janesville Gazette via AP, File)
August 02, 2018 - 2:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Commerce Department is going ahead with a tax on Canadian newsprint, a threat to the already-struggling American newspaper industry. The revised tariffs unveiled Thursday are mostly lower than those originally imposed earlier this year. But they would still hit the paper...
Read More
FILE - In this March 17, 2011, file photo, cans of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke sit in a cooler at a deli in Portland, Ore. Items ranging from canned beverages to airline tickets will likely get more expensive, companies warn, as they face higher costs. Procter & Gamble, one of the biggest makers of consumer products, said Tuesday, July 31, 2018, that Pampers prices will increase by an average of 4 percent in North America, while the Bounty, Charmin and Puffs brands could see 5 percent increases. (AP Photo, File)
August 01, 2018 - 12:12 am
The price of a can of Coca-Cola? Likely going up. A package of Pampers? That too. Plane tickets? They also may be more expensive. These items and more may cost more in the coming months as people start feeling the effects of higher fuel prices and raw-material costs as well as a range of tariffs...
Read More

Pages