Lumber and timber industry

In this Oct. 5, 2019 photo, Daniel Leonard and his father Joe, right, stand near a heap of lumber on their family's property. The massive storm killed more than two dozen people in northern Florida, destroyed hundreds of homes and brought catastrophic damage to the region’s timber industry. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan)
October 12, 2019 - 9:01 pm
BLOUNTSTOWN, Fla. (AP) — The sunsets are a sight to behold in Joe Leonard's neck of the woods these days. A year ago, lush stands of towering pines obscured the horizon, he said as he drove his pickup along a dusty Florida Panhandle road. Now, fields of thick grass mask row after row of stumps...
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A man stands as convoy of trucks and tractors circle the Oregon state Capitol on Thursday, June 27, 2019 in Salem, Ore. Protesters are supporting the eleven Republican senators who walked out over a week ago to avoid a vote on climate legislation. (Michaela Roman/Statesman-Journal via AP)
June 27, 2019 - 1:59 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A parade of trucks and tractors circled the Oregon Capitol on Thursday in support of Republican lawmakers who have walked out to block emissions-lowering climate legislation in a political crisis that stretched into an eighth day. All 11 Republican senators were once again...
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FILE - In this June 4, 2019, file photo, Kelsey Rose Juliana, of Eugene, Ore, speaks at a rally for a group of young people who filed an environmental lawsuit against the U.S. government in Portland, Ore. Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming. (AP Photo/Steve Dipaola, File)
June 16, 2019 - 9:36 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming. Supporters call it the United States' most progressive climate policy, saying it not...
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In this July 25, 2018, photo, Stephen Bell, president and CEO of the Arkadelphia Area Chamber of Commerce, talks about a new railroad spur that is being built to support the needs of what he hopes will be a new paper mill, one of several Chinese-backed deals Arkansas has landed in recent years, in Arkadelphia, Ark. State and local officials in Arkansas are scrambling to preserve development deals with Chinese companies amid President Donald Trump's escalating tariff battle. "It's like a dark cloud hanging over the future of the project," Bell said. "Right now, the clouds are off on the horizon. But I think no one knows where the trade situation is going right now." (AP Photo/Karen E. Segrave)
August 08, 2018 - 8:28 am
ARKADELPHIA, Ark. (AP) — A Chinese company's announcement two years ago that it would spend more than $1 billion and hire hundreds of workers for a paper mill on the outskirts of this rural college town was seen as a much-needed shot in the arm for the region's economy. A web video promoting...
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FILE - In this March 17, 2011, file photo, cans of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke sit in a cooler at a deli in Portland, Ore. Items ranging from canned beverages to airline tickets will likely get more expensive, companies warn, as they face higher costs. Procter & Gamble, one of the biggest makers of consumer products, said Tuesday, July 31, 2018, that Pampers prices will increase by an average of 4 percent in North America, while the Bounty, Charmin and Puffs brands could see 5 percent increases. (AP Photo, File)
August 01, 2018 - 12:12 am
The price of a can of Coca-Cola? Likely going up. A package of Pampers? That too. Plane tickets? They also may be more expensive. These items and more may cost more in the coming months as people start feeling the effects of higher fuel prices and raw-material costs as well as a range of tariffs...
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