Legislature

Former US Rep. Pete Sessions speak to the McLennan County Republican Party Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019, in Waco, Texas as he runs to fill the seat of Bill Flores who is stepping down (Jerry Larson/ Waco Tribune-Herald, via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 2:47 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Former Republican Rep. Pete Sessions' climb back into Congress was already off to a rough start, with some in his own party suggesting he was carpetbagging by leaving the Dallas district he lost last fall to try to get elected in a far more rural and politically safe one. Now...
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This Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, photo shows the Adelanto U.S. Immigration and Enforcement Processing Center operated by GEO Group, Inc. (GEO) a Florida-based company specializing in privatized corrections in Adelanto, Calif. California is banning the use of for-profit, private detention facilities, including those the federal government uses for immigrants awaiting deportation hearings. California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Friday, Oct. 11, 2019 he had signed a measure into law that helps fulfill his promise to end the use of private prisons.(AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
October 11, 2019 - 1:36 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will ban the use of for-profit, private detention facilities, including those under contract to the federal government to hold immigrants awaiting deportation hearings, under a bill that Gov. Gavin Newsom said Friday that he had signed. The Democratic governor...
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California Gov. Gavin Newsom, seated hands Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San Francisco, second from right, a copy of his bill that Newsom signed at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. The law allows employers, co-workers and teachers to seek gun violence restraining orders for people they believe to be a danger to themselves or others. Ting's measure was one of more than a dozen gun control bills the governor signed Friday. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2019 - 12:53 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed a law that will make the state the first to allow employers, co-workers and teachers to seek gun violence restraining orders against other people. The bill was vetoed twice by former governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, and goes...
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President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
October 11, 2019 - 12:40 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota Democrats, Muslims and other groups condemned President Donald Trump on Friday for criticizing the state for welcoming so many Somali refugees, and they called out Republican leaders for failing to criticize his statements. At his campaign rally Thursday night in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C. speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.Retiring House and Senate Republicans are a natural group to watch for defectors as Democrats’ impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump builds steam. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
October 11, 2019 - 10:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Republicans eager for a united GOP front will be eyeing retiring lawmakers for signs of cracking as Democrats' impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump heats up. So far, there's no indication that the retirees are about to crack. Party leaders got a positive signal this...
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President Donald Trump answers questions from reporters during an event on "transparency in Federal guidance and enforcement" in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 11, 2019 - 8:51 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled Friday that President Donald Trump's financial records must be turned over to the House of Representatives. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said that lawmakers should get the documents they have subpoenaed from Mazars...
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Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, arrives on Capitol Hill, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, as she is scheduled to testify before congressional lawmakers on Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
October 11, 2019 - 8:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch appeared on Capitol Hill Friday for a deposition in the Democrats' impeachment inquiry, accepting lawmakers' invitation to testify despite President Donald Trump's declaration that his administration wouldn't cooperate with the...
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Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, arrives on Capitol Hill, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, as she is scheduled to testify before congressional lawmakers on Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 11, 2019 - 7:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former U.S. Ukraine ambassador Marie Yovanovitch and the House impeachment probe (all times local): 10:15 a.m. Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch has arrived on Capitol Hill for a deposition in the Democrats' impeachment inquiry despite President...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump is joined by Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, second from right, as he arrives at Melsbroek Air Base, in Brussels, Belgium. Sondland, wrapped up in a congressional impeachment inquiry, was a late convert to Trump, initially supporting another candidate in the Republican primary and once refusing to participate in a fundraiser on his behalf. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
October 11, 2019 - 7:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former U.S. Ukraine ambassador Marie Yovanovitch and the House impeachment probe (all times local): 10:15 a.m. Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch has arrived on Capitol Hill for a deposition in the Democrats' impeachment inquiry despite President...
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FILE - In this Nov. 1, 2017, file photo, Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington. Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election has generally been seen as two separate, unrelated tracks: hacking Democratic emails and sending provocative tweets. But a new study suggests the tactics were likely intertwined. On the eve of the release of hacked Clinton campaign emails, Russian-linked trolls retweeted messages from thousands of accounts on both extremes of the American ideological spectrum. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)
October 11, 2019 - 6:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election has generally been seen as two separate, unrelated tracks: hacking Democratic emails and sending provocative tweets. But a new study suggests the tactics were likely intertwined. On the eve of the release of hacked Clinton campaign...
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