Legislature

Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., left, chair of the House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee, speaks alongside ranking member, Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wisc., during a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing with representatives from major tech companies, Tuesday, July 16, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
July 17, 2019 - 1:37 am
Big Tech faced tough questions Tuesday as federal lawmakers focused on issues of potentially anticompetitive behavior by technology giants and expressed bipartisan skepticism over Facebook's plan for a new digital currency. Companies such as Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon have long enjoyed...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, April 10, 2019, file photo, Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., listens to testimony during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Gardner had good news for Colorado voters and a planned rollout. But Trump’s tweets about four Democratic women of color overshadowed his success. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
July 16, 2019 - 9:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner had reeled in a big political fish. A major government agency, the Bureau of Land Management, was moving to his state and marking a victory years in the making for one of the Senate's most vulnerable Republicans. But Gardner's moment of triumph rolled...
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives for a closed-door session with her caucus before a vote on a resolution condemning what she called "racist comments" by President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 16, 2019. His remarks were directed at Reps. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 16, 2019 - 9:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a remarkable political repudiation, the Democratic-led U.S. House voted to condemn President Donald Trump's "racist comments" against four congresswomen of color, despite protestations by Trump's Republican congressional allies and his own insistence he hasn't "a racist bone in...
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FILE - In this June 27, 2018 file photo, Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., asks a question of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
July 16, 2019 - 6:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Mr. Civility had had enough. "We don't ever, ever want to pass up, it seems, an opportunity to escalate," Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II, D-Mo., said from the House speaker's chair Tuesday afternoon after a fight broke out over a resolution to condemn President Donald Trump's "racist...
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FILE - In this Monday, June 10, 2019, file photo, police officers use pepper spray against protesters in a rally against the proposed amendments to the extradition law at the Legislative Council in Hong Kong. What began as a protest against an extradition bill has ballooned into a fundamental challenge to the way Hong Kong is governed _ and the role of the Chinese government in the city’s affairs. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)
July 16, 2019 - 5:30 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Colin Wong has come to know the sting of pepper spray well. After more than a month of demonstrations in Hong Kong's sweltering heat, memories of the burning sensation are a constant reminder of what protesters call an excessive use of force by police. Each time he felt the now-...
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FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2013, file photo, U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., discusses his first months back in Congress during an interview in Mount Pleasant, S.C. Sanford said Tuesday, July 16, 2019 he's pondering a 2020 primary challenge to President Donald Trump, but political observers - and those who know the former governor and congressman well - say it's nothing more than an attempt to keep himself relevant in the wake of his first-ever electoral loss last year. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith, File)
July 16, 2019 - 3:46 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Mark Sanford, the former South Carolina governor and congressman, floated the possibility on Tuesday that he would mount an uphill challenge to President Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination. His motivations were immediately greeted with skepticism from some...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, listens as Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., left, speaks to reporters following the weekly policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
July 16, 2019 - 1:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's racist tweets about four Democratic lawmakers of color (all times local): 4:45 p.m. An objection by House Republicans to Speaker Nancy Pelosi's remarks criticizing President Donald Trump's tweets against Democratic congresswomen of color has...
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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., flanked by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., left, and Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., condemns remarks by President Donald Trump as he speaks to reporters following a Democratic policy meeting, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 16, 2019 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer opened the door on Tuesday to ending the procedural rule that requires 60 votes to steer most bills through the chamber if Democrats take the Senate and White House in 2020 — a boon to presidential candidates and activists in his party who have...
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FILE - In this June 12, 2019 file photo, Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., listens to debate as the House Oversight and Reform Committee considers whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for failing to turn over subpoenaed documents related to the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Amash, the only Republican in Congress to support the impeachment of President Donald Trump, said Thursday, July 3 he is leaving the GOP because he has become disenchanted with partisan politics and "frightened by what I see from it." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File )
July 16, 2019 - 11:23 am
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A Democrat running to replace Michigan Rep. Justin Amash said Tuesday she raised $100,000 in the first week since announcing her campaign for what's become a crowded — and newly competitive — three-way race. Attorney Hillary Scholten of Grand Rapids joined the race last...
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FILE - In this June 12, 2019 file photo, Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., listens to debate as the House Oversight and Reform Committee considers whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for failing to turn over subpoenaed documents related to the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Amash, the only Republican in Congress to support the impeachment of President Donald Trump, said Thursday, July 3 he is leaving the GOP because he has become disenchanted with partisan politics and "frightened by what I see from it." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File )
July 16, 2019 - 11:06 am
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A Democrat running to replace Michigan Rep. Justin Amash says she raised $100,000 in the first week since announcing her campaign. Attorney Hillary Scholten of Grand Rapids joined the race last week, days after Amash said he was leaving the Republican Party and would seek...
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