Legal proceedings

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Finnish President Sauli Niinisto in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 03, 2019 - 3:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is rapidly confronting a decision at the core of House Democrats’ nascent impeachment inquiry: Should he comply with congressional demands and risk disclosure of embarrassing information? Or should he delay and possibly deepen his legal and political...
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In this Sept. 26, 2019, photo, cars pass Rockefeller University in New York. Prestigious universities around the world, including Rockefeller, have accepted at least $60 million over the past five years from the family that owns the maker of OxyContin, even as the company became embroiled in lawsuits related to the opioid epidemic, financial records show. Rockefeller accepted more money from the Sacklers than any other school in recent history. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
October 03, 2019 - 3:36 am
BOSTON (AP) — Prestigious universities around the world have accepted at least $60 million over the past five years from the family that owns the maker of OxyContin, even as the company became embroiled in lawsuits related to the opioid epidemic, financial records show. Some of the donations...
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Former Rep. Bill McCollum, R-Fla., now a partner at Dentons, a multinational law firm in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. McCollum was one of the 14 House impeachment "managers" who presented the case against President Clinton to the Senate in 1998. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
October 03, 2019 - 1:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Some have regrets. A few can’t talk about it. Others would do it all again. But the Republicans who carried out President Bill Clinton’s impeachment in 1998 are unanimous in urging caution and restraint as Congress embarks on yet another impeachment struggle, this time over...
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October 02, 2019 - 7:54 pm
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — A court in Cambodia has ordered a new investigation and postponed a verdict in the espionage trial of two journalists who had worked for a U.S. Government-backed radio station. Uon Chhin and Yeang Sothearin were arrested in November 2017 during a crackdown on the media...
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In this Aug. 23, 2019 photo, former U.S. Attorney Dan Webb takes the oath of special prosecutor before Judge Michael Toomin, during an status hearing concerning actor Jussie Smollett at the Leighton Criminal Court building, in Chicago. The latest twist in the Jussie Smollett saga is the revelation of a possible conflict of interest by the special prosecutor investigating why prosecutors dropped charges accusing the actor of staging a racist, homophobic attack on himself. Dan Webb disclosed this week he once co-hosted a political fundraiser for a figure central to his investigation, Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx. A Cook County judge must now decide if bias or the appearance of bias renders Webb's position untenable.(Antonio Perez/ Chicago Tribune via AP, Pool)
October 02, 2019 - 4:49 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A Chicago judge could decide this week whether the special prosecutor investigating possible conflicts of interest in Jussie Smollett’s criminal case has a conflict himself, the latest twist in a saga marked by turns and reversals since the “Empire” actor reported a racist,...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2019, file photo, Black Lives Matter demonstrator waves a flag on the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the Bloody Sunday commemoration in Selma, Ala. Majorities of Americans across racial lines say white people are treated more fairly than black people by the police, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The dynamic has played out in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement, which began in 2014 with the fatal shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown by white, former Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett, File)
October 02, 2019 - 3:20 pm
Majorities of Americans across racial lines say white people are treated more fairly than black people by the police, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But the poll finds a disconnect between white Americans who identify disparate treatment...
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FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2016 file photo, Haitians make their way towards the border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico. The Trump administration is planning to expand the collection of DNA from migrants who cross the U.S. border, and to include the information in a massive criminal database operated by the FBI (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, file)
October 02, 2019 - 2:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is planning to expand the collection of DNA from migrants who cross U.S. borders, and to include the information in a massive criminal database operated by the FBI. The effort is separate from and much broader than the rapid DNA testing done on families at...
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October 02, 2019 - 1:52 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A man who says his donated sperm was used to father at least 17 children in violation of an agreement that allowed for more than five has sued an Oregon fertility clinic. Dr. Bryce Cleary believes it’s possible that he has many more children from his sperm donations 30 years...
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FILE - In this June 21, 2019 file photo, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania William McSwain speaks with members of the media at a news conference at the U.S. Custom House in Philadelphia. A federal judge ruled Wednesday, Oct. 2, that a Philadelphia nonprofit’s proposal to open the nation’s first supervised injection site does not violate federal law,the first court decision in the country to definitively weigh in on the matter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
October 02, 2019 - 1:48 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A federal judge ruled Wednesday that supervised injection sites designed to prevent overdoses would not violate federal drug laws, potentially giving advocates in Philadelphia and elsewhere a boost in their efforts to open such centers. U.S. District Judge Gerald A. McHugh said...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2017, file photo, provided by Harding University in Searcy, Ark., Botham Jean leads worship at a university presidential reception in Dallas. Fired Dallas police Officer Amber Guyger, who shot and killed Botham Jean, an unarmed 26-year-old neighbor in his own apartment last year, was found guilty of murder by a jury on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019. She told police she thought his apartment was her own and that he was an intruder.(Jeff Montgomery/Harding University via AP, File)
October 02, 2019 - 1:43 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Botham Jean organized church mission trips. He installed Skype for elderly parents who missed their kids. One time he met a stranger who shared his mom’s birthday, so the bighearted 6-foot-1 choir singer got the woman a cake. He cried after getting a job in Dallas at the powerhouse...
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