Legal proceedings

FILE - This July 18, 2018, file courtroom sketch depicts Maria Butina, listening to Assistant U.S. Attorney Erik Kenerson as he speaks to Judge Deborah Robinson, left, during a hearing in federal court in Washington. New court papers reveal that Butina, accused of being a Russian agent, is in negotiations with federal prosecutors about a "potential resolution" to her case. It's the first acknowledgement that Maria Butina is potentially working on a plea deal or some other conclusion to her criminal case. (Dana Verkouteren via AP)
November 16, 2018 - 12:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A gun-rights activist accused of being a Russian agent is negotiating a "potential resolution" to her criminal case, federal prosecutors and her lawyers said Friday. Lawyers for Maria Butina and prosecutors in Washington made the disclosure in a joint court filing , the first...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2018, file photo, Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross speaks to employees of the Department of Commerce in Washington. The Supreme Court is allowing a trial over the decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census to go forward over the Trump administration’s objection. The justices’ issued a brief order Friday, Nov. 2, rejecting the administration’s request to postpone the trial, set to begin Monday in New York.(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
November 16, 2018 - 11:43 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says it will hear arguments over the evidence a federal judge can consider in the lawsuit concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. U.S. District Judge Jesse M. Furman is currently presiding over a trial in New York to determine if...
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November 16, 2018 - 10:58 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A prominent Holocaust researcher said Friday that he is suing a Polish organization for libel after it waged a public campaign last year accusing him of slandering Poland's good name with his work exploring Polish violence against Jews during World War II. Historian Jan...
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CNN's Jim Acosta speaks to journalists on the North Lawn upon returning back to the White House in Washington, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Kelly ordered the White House to immediately return Acosta’s credentials. He found that Acosta was “irreparably harmed” and dismissed the government’s argument that CNN could send another reporter in Acosta’s place to cover the White House. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
November 16, 2018 - 10:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge ordered the Trump administration on Friday to immediately return the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta, though a lawsuit over the credentials' revocation is continuing. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Kelly, an appointee of President Donald...
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November 16, 2018 - 9:18 am
ISTANBUL (AP) — A court in Istanbul convicted six people and sentenced them to life in prison for involvement in an extremist attack at Istanbul's main airport that killed 45 people and was blamed on the Islamic State group, Turkey's state-run news agency reported Friday. The six were convicted of...
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November 16, 2018 - 9:15 am
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Thousands of Navy and Marine Corps veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan who developed post-traumatic stress disorder but were denied Veterans Affairs health benefits have been given a green light to sue the military, under a ruling by a federal judge in Connecticut. Senior U.S...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2009, file photo, artist Robert Indiana poses at his studio in Vinalhaven, Maine. The estate of Indiana, creator of the iconic LOVE series, is auctioning off two paintings that belonged to him to raise money to defend against a lawsuit and to stabilize his deteriorating home. (AP Photo/Joel Page, File)
November 16, 2018 - 5:59 am
VINALHAVEN, Maine (AP) — The estate of artist Robert Indiana, creator of the iconic LOVE series, is auctioning off two paintings that belonged to him to raise money to defend against a lawsuit and to stabilize his deteriorating home. Not everyone is happy about it. Critics, including Princeton art...
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In this photo released by the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, Nuon Chea, who was the Khmer Rouge's chief ideologist and No. 2 leader, sits in a court room before a hearing at the U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018. The international tribunal to judge the criminal responsibility of former Khmer Rouge leaders for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians opened its session Friday to deliver its verdicts on charges of genocide and other crimes. (Mark Peters/Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia via AP)
November 16, 2018 - 3:41 am
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — The last surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime that ruled Cambodia in the 1970s, when their reign of terror was responsible for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million people, were convicted Friday by an international tribunal of genocide, crimes against humanity...
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Khieu Samphan, former Khmer Rouge head of state, is seen on screen at the court's press center at the U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal on the outskirts of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018. The U.N.-backed tribunal judging the criminal responsibility of former Khmer Rouge leaders for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians will issue verdicts Friday in the latest — and perhaps last — of such trials. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
November 16, 2018 - 3:09 am
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — The Latest on the tribunal judging Khmer Rouge responsibility (all times local): 11:40 a.m. An international tribunal that found two former Khmer Rouge leaders guilty of genocide has sentenced them to life in prison. The elderly Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan are the last...
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CORRECTS LAST OF ATTORNEY TO BALAREZO FROM BALAZERO - During his opening statement, Assistant U.S. Attorney Adam Feels, left, gestures to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, second from right, sitting next to his attorney Eduardo Balarezo, at Brooklyn Federal Court, as Guzman's high-security trial got underway in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. The infamous Mexican drug lord has been held in solitary confinement since his extradition to the United States early last year. Guzman pleaded not guilty to charges that he amassed a multi-billion-dollar fortune smuggling tons of cocaine and other drugs in a vast supply chain that reached New York, New Jersey, Texas and elsewhere north of the border. (Elizabeth Williams via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 4:08 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When the notorious drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman was Mexico's most-wanted fugitive in 2001 following a prison breakout, he was startled to see a police motorcycle pull in front of a car carrying him as it reached the outskirts of Mexico City. A loyal drug cartel lieutenant...
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