Labor issues

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 31, 2018, file photo, people opposing Proposition A listen to a speaker during a rally in Kansas City, Mo. Missouri votes Tuesday, Aug. 7 on a so-called right-to-work law, a voter referendum seeking to ban compulsory union fees in all private-sector workplaces. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
August 07, 2018 - 7:53 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri voters delivered a resounding victory to unions Tuesday, rejecting a right-to-work law against compulsory union fees that had been passed by Republican state officials but placed on hold for more than a year after organized labor petitioned for a referendum...
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August 07, 2018 - 10:15 am
SAN LUIS, Ariz. (AP) — The 3-year-old boy with a bowl haircut and striped shirt silently clung to his father in the back of a U.S. Border Patrol truck. Their shoes still muddy from crossing the border, the father and son had just been apprehended at a canal near a border fence in Arizona on a muggy...
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Russian activist of the feminist protest group Pussy Riot Maria Alekhina talks to a policeman as she holds a protest in front of the Federal Penitentiary building in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. Pussy Riot protest against torture in Russian prisons. (AP Photo/ Alexander Sofeev)
August 07, 2018 - 8:48 am
MOSCOW (AP) — An activist from Russian punk collective Pussy Riot has led a protest outside the headquarters of the state penitentiary agency to protest torture and slave labor in Russian prisons. Pussy Riot member Maria Alekhina and activist Dmitry Tsorionov put banners and photos of inmates who...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, July 31, 2018, file photo, people opposing Proposition A listen to a speaker during a rally in Kansas City, Mo. Missouri votes Tuesday, Aug. 7 on a so-called right-to-work law, a voter referendum seeking to ban compulsory union fees in all private-sector workplaces. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
August 04, 2018 - 1:58 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — On the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling weakening public-sector unions, labor's clout is being put to a new test by a voter referendum in Missouri over whether the state should ban compulsory union fees in all private-sector workplaces. The statewide vote in Tuesday's...
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FILE In this June 21, 2018 file photo, a job applicant looks at job listings for the Riverside Hotel at a job fair hosted by Job News South Florida, in Sunrise, Fla. Economists forecast that employers added 191,000 jobs in July, down from 213,000 in June but easily enough to lower the unemployment rate over time. The jobless rate is projected to decline to 3.9 percent, near an 18-year low, from 4 percent. The Labor Department’s monthly jobs report will be released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Friday, Aug. 3. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
August 03, 2018 - 6:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers slowed their hiring in July, adding 157,000 jobs, a solid gain but below the healthy pace in the first half of this year. The unemployment rate ticked down to 3.9 percent from 4 percent, the Labor Department said Friday. That's near an 18-year low of 3.8 percent...
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FILE In this June 21, 2018 file photo, a job applicant looks at job listings for the Riverside Hotel at a job fair hosted by Job News South Florida, in Sunrise, Fla. Economists forecast that employers added 191,000 jobs in July, down from 213,000 in June but easily enough to lower the unemployment rate over time. The jobless rate is projected to decline to 3.9 percent, near an 18-year low, from 4 percent. The Labor Department’s monthly jobs report will be released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Friday, Aug. 3. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
August 03, 2018 - 3:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — With a robust economy at their backs, optimistic employers likely added jobs at a solid pace in July. Economists forecast that employers added 191,000 jobs last month, down from 213,000 in June but easily enough to lower the unemployment rate over time. The jobless rate is...
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FILE - In this June 28, 2018, file photo, Department of Homeland Security officers take action to reopen Portland's Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters in Portland, Ore. The union that represents employees of Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Monday, July 30, 2018, called on the Portland mayor to immediately provide law enforcement services to ICE employees. (Mark Graves/The Oregonian via AP, File)
July 31, 2018 - 1:54 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The union representing employees of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement urged the mayor of Portland, Oregon, to end his ban on city police helping ICE workers who have faced hostility from pro-immigrant activists. Sean Riddell, the union's attorney, asked Mayor Ted...
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Tia Agnew, co-founder and CEO of New Day Craft, an Indianapolis-based producer of mead and cider, poses in the tasting room in Indianapolis, Monday, July 30, 2018. Agnew said she was excited to put up her "Open to All" window sticker, which she says matches her "personal and professional ethos." She's not worried that it will be a turn-off to some potential patrons. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
July 30, 2018 - 9:33 pm
Levi Strauss, Yelp and Lyft are leading a coalition of 1,200 businesses and cities that are pledging not to discriminate against employees or customers based on race, sexual orientation, or other characteristics. Normally, making a promise to serve every customer might seem like a no-brainer. But...
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FILE - In this Monday, June 25, 2018 file photo, people gather at the Supreme Court awaiting a decision in an Illinois union dues case, Janus vs. AFSCME, in Washington. An Oregon state employee and a labor union have reached a settlement over her lawsuit seeking payback of obligatory union fees, marking the first refund of forced fees since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in late June that government workers can't be required to contribute to labor groups, the employee's lawyers said Monday, July 30, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
July 30, 2018 - 6:50 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon state employee and a labor union have reached a settlement over her lawsuit seeking payback of obligatory union fees, marking the first refund of forced fees since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in late June that government workers can't be required to contribute to labor...
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FILE - In this Wednesday June 27, 2001 file photo, Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's lawyers Dragoslav Ognjanovic, center, and Zdenko Tomanovic, right, address media after the team visited imprisoned Milosevic in Belgrade. Serbian police say that a prominent lawyer, who helped defend former strongman Slobodan Milosevic before the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal, has been shot and killed. A police statement says that Dragoslav Ognjanovic was killed late on Saturday, July 28, 2018 outside his home the new part of Belgrade, the Serbian capital. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, file)
July 29, 2018 - 8:14 am
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Lawyers in Serbia declared a weeklong strike Sunday to protest the killing of a prominent attorney who was on the legal team that defended former Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic at the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal. Dragoslav Ognjanovic, 56, was gunned down late Saturday...
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