Human rights and civil liberties

Supporters of LGBT rights stage a protest on the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court heard arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 13, 2019 - 7:16 am
National Coming Out Day festivities were tempered this year by anxiety that some LGBT folk may have to go back into the closet so they can make a living, depending on what the Supreme Court decides about workplace discrimination law. But the mere fact that words like "transgender" are being uttered...
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Supporters of LGBT rights stage a protest on the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court heard arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 13, 2019 - 7:13 am
National Coming Out Day was tempered this year by anxiety that some LGBT folk may have to go back into the closet so they can make a living, depending on what the Supreme Court decides about workplace discrimination law. But the mere fact that words like "transgender" are being uttered before the...
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FILE - This Sept. 18, 2007 file photo shows soprano Jessye Norman performing during The Dream Concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Norman died, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019, at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York. She was 74. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File)
October 12, 2019 - 10:26 am
The funeral to celebrate the life and legacy of international opera icon Jessye Norman commenced Saturday in the singer's Georgia hometown where she got her start in music. Family, friends and famous faces gathered at the William B. Bell Auditorium — a 2,800-seat theater inside the James Brown...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2019 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at the SEIU Unions For All Summit in Los Angeles. For 41 years, federal law has banned pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. But the stories tumbling out this week show it’s far from eradicated. Prompted by Warren’s claim that she was forced out of a teaching job in 1971 because she was pregnant, scores of women have shared similar stories on social media. Police officers, academics, fast food workers, lawyers, flight attendants and others say they hid pregnancies on the job or during interviews, faced demotion or demeaning comments and were even fired after revealing a pregnancy.(AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
October 12, 2019 - 7:50 am
For 41 years, federal law has banned pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. But the stories tumbling out this week show it's far from eradicated. Prompted by presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren's claim that she was forced out of a teaching job in 1971 because she was pregnant, scores of...
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A Turkish police armored vehicle patrols the town of Akcakale, Sanliurfa province, southeastern Turkey, at the border with Syria, Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019. The towns along Turkey's border with northeastern Syria have been on high alert after dozens of mortars fired from Kurdish-held Syria landed, killing several civilians. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
October 12, 2019 - 5:53 am
AKCAKALE, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on Turkey's invasion of northeastern Syria in a military operation against Syrian Kurdish fighters there (all times local): 3:55 p.m. Lebanon's top diplomat is calling on the Arab League to restore Syria's membership amid Turkey's military offensive in northern...
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California Gov. Gavin Newsom, seated hands Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San Francisco, second from right, a copy of his bill that Newsom signed at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. The law allows employers, co-workers and teachers to seek gun violence restraining orders for people they believe to be a danger to themselves or others. Ting's measure was one of more than a dozen gun control bills the governor signed Friday. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2019 - 12:53 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed a law that will make the state the first to allow employers, co-workers and teachers to seek gun violence restraining orders against other people. The bill was vetoed twice by former governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, and goes...
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October 11, 2019 - 11:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. is hoping to keep Venezuela from winning a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council. A State Department official said Friday that members of the U.N. General Assembly should vote against Venezuela next week because of severe human rights abuses under President...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., answers a question as CNN moderator Chris Cuomo listens during the Power of our Pride Town Hall Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019, in Los Angeles. The LGBTQ-focused town hall featured nine 2020 Democratic presidential candidates. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
October 11, 2019 - 9:26 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Chris Cuomo is apologizing for a remark at the top of a CNN town hall on LGBTQ issues that angered some members of the community and their supporters. When Sen. Kamala Harris took the stage Thursday and told Cuomo that her personal pronouns were "she, her and hers," Cuomo answered "...
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Supporters of LGBTQ rights hold placards in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court heard arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 10, 2019 - 3:52 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nine Democratic presidential candidates are taking a detour from a 2020 campaign roiled by the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump to make a play for support within a key party constituency: LGBTQ voters. Leading candidates Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren will be joined...
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FILE - In this March 30, 2019, file photo, Alexanda Amon Kotey, left, and El Shafee Elsheikh, who were allegedly among four British jihadis who made up a brutal Islamic State cell dubbed "The Beatles," speak during an interview with The Associated Press at a security center in Kobani, Syria, Friday, March 30, 2018. The men said that their home country's revoking of their citizenship denies them a fair trial. "The Beatles" terror cell is believed to have captured, tortured and killed hostages including American, British and Japanese journalists and aid workers. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
October 10, 2019 - 2:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An American woman whose son was killed by the Islamic State said Thursday that she is hopeful the transfer to U.S. custody of two British militants brings them a step closer to criminal charges. Diane Foley told The Associated Press that she would like to see the men prosecuted in...
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