Earth science

A storm chaser climbs into his vehicle during the eye of Hurricane Michael to retrieve equipment after a hotel canopy collapsed in Panama City Beach, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 10, 2018 - 2:15 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the continental U.S. in...
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Peter Salovey, President of Yale University, right, welcomes Yale University Professor William Nordhaus, one of the 2018 winners of the Nobel Prize in economics, to the podium just before speaking about the honor Monday, Oct. 8, 2018, in New Haven, Conn. Nordhaus was named for integrating climate change into long term macroeconomic analysis. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
October 08, 2018 - 3:02 pm
Advocates of taxing fossil fuels believe their position is stronger now because of an alarming new report on climate change and a Nobel Prize awarded to by two American economists, but neither development is likely to break down political resistance to a carbon tax. Previous alarms about global...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2010 file photo, then Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Senior Fellow Paul Romer attends the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Two researchers at American universities have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize for Economics. Yale University's William Nordhaus was named for integrating climate change into long term macroeconomic analysis and New York University's Paul Romer was awarded for factoring technological innovation into macroeconomics. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
October 08, 2018 - 6:56 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in economics on Monday, one for studying the economics of climate change and the other for showing how to help foster the innovation needed to solve such a problem. William Nordhaus of Yale University and Paul Romer of New York University will...
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FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2015 file photo, fish swim over a patch of bleached coral in Hawaii's Kaneohe Bay off the island of Oahu. Warmer water is repeatedly causing mass global bleaching events to Earth's fragile coral reefs. A United Nations science report released on Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018 (Monday, Oct. 8, South Korea time) says limiting global warming by an extra degree could be a matter of life or death for people and ecosystems. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
October 07, 2018 - 6:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2018 file photo, wind turbines stand over a farmhouse near Northwood, Iowa. A new study out of Harvard finds that ramping up wind power in America would also dial up the nation’s temperatures. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
October 04, 2018 - 2:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ramping up wind power in America would also dial up the nation's temperatures, a new study out of Harvard found. While wind energy is widely celebrated as environmentally friendly, the researchers concluded that a dramatic, all-out expansion in the number of turbines could warm...
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A giant plume of volcanic ash rises from Mount Soputan, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in the town of Tomohon, Northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. The volcano erupted Wednesday morning on the same central Indonesian island as an earlier earthquake and authorities warned planes about volcanic ash in the air. (AP Photo/Hetty Andih)
October 03, 2018 - 2:18 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A volcano erupted Wednesday on the same central Indonesian island struck last week by a powerful earthquake and tsunami, and authorities warned planes about volcanic ash in the air. Mount Soputan on Sulawesi island spewed a massive column of ash more than 6,000 meters (19,...
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People survey the damage following a massive earthquake and tsunami in Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018. Rescuers were scrambling Sunday to try to find trapped victims in collapsed buildings where voices could be heard screaming for help after a massive earthquake in Indonesia spawned a deadly tsunami two days ago. (AP Photo/Rifki)
September 30, 2018 - 5:35 pm
MAKASSAR, Indonesia (AP) — An early warning system that might have prevented some deaths in the tsunami that hit an Indonesian island on Friday has been stalled in the testing phase for years. The high-tech system of seafloor sensors, data-laden sound waves and fiber-optic cable was meant to...
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World map showing areas affected by typhoons and hurricanes.; 2c x 2 inches; 96.3 mm x 50 mm;
September 15, 2018 - 9:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nature expresses its fury in sundry ways. Two deadly storms — Hurricane Florence and Typhoon Mangkhut — roared ashore on the same day, half a world apart, but the way they spread devastation was as different as water and wind. Storms in the western Pacific generally hit with much...
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The United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket with the NASA Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) onboard is seen shortly after the mobile service tower at SLC-2 was rolled back, Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The ICESat-2 mission will measure the changing height of Earth's ice. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
September 15, 2018 - 6:17 am
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AP) — A NASA satellite designed to precisely measure changes in Earths ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice and vegetation was launched into polar orbit from California early Saturday. A Delta 2 rocket carrying ICESat-2 lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 6:02 a...
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This satellite image provided by NOAA shows Hurricane Florence on the eastern coast of the United States on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (NOAA via AP)
September 14, 2018 - 4:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A warmer world makes for nastier hurricanes. Scientists say they are wetter, possess more energy and intensify faster. Their storm surges are more destructive because climate change has already made the seas rise. And lately, the storms seem to be stalling more often and thus...
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