Data privacy

December 19, 2018 - 10:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The District of Columbia sued Facebook on Wednesday for allowing data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica to improperly access data from as many as 87 million users. D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine's suit alleges that Facebook misled users about the security of their data and failed...
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FILE - In this March 15, 2013, file photo, a man walks past a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, USA. Facebook gave some companies more extensive access to users’ personal data than it has previously revealed, letting them read private messages or see the names of friends without consent, according to a New York Times report published Wednesday Dec. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
December 19, 2018 - 6:36 am
Facebook gave some companies more extensive access to users' personal data than it has previously revealed, letting them read private messages or see the names of friends without consent, according to a New York Times report. The newspaper on Wednesday detailed special arrangements between Facebook...
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FILE- In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. In itself, Facebook’s latest privacy bug doesn’t sound like a big deal. But it’s part of a pattern for the social media giant that shows just how much data it has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. The company said Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 that software bug may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than users had granted permission for. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 14, 2018 - 1:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 11:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. lawmakers' grilling of Google CEO Sundar Pichai may have sounded like a broken record, but it amplified the prickly issues facing tech companies as Democrats prepare to take control of the House next month. The 3 1/2-hour hearing Tuesday hit upon familiar themes — online...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 10:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Questions on privacy, data collection, China, Russia —and especially political bias — dominated Google CEO Sundar Pichai's grilling before Congress Tuesday. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy opened the House Judiciary Committee hearing by noting a "widening gap of distrust"...
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FILE- In this April 10, 2018, file photo Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pauses while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access. The documents show internal discussions about linking data to revenue. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
December 05, 2018 - 9:01 am
LONDON (AP) — A U.K. Parliament committee accused Facebook on Wednesday of cutting special deals with some advertisers to give them more access to data as it released 250 pages worth of documents on the tech giant's internal discussions about the value of users' personal information. Parliament's...
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This photo posed for the photographer on Tuesday Nov. 27, 2018 and made available by the House of Commons shows the International Grand Committee with representation from 9 Parliaments and Mark Zuckerberg in non-attendance. Lawmakers from nine countries grilled Facebook executive, Richard Allan, on Tuesday as part of an international hearing at Britain's parliament on disinformation and "fake news." Facebook's vice president for policy solutions, answered questions in place of his boss, CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who ignored repeated requests to appear. (Gabriel Sainhas/House of Commons via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 10:13 am
LONDON (AP) — A cohort of international lawmakers is trying to turn up the pressure on Facebook, grilling one of its executives and making a show of founder Mark Zuckerberg's refusal to explain to them why his company failed to protect users' data privacy. The rare "international grand committee"...
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Leave campaigner and businessman Arron Banks, centre, speaks to the media outside BBC Broadcasting House in London, after appearing on the Andrew Marr show, in London, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018. Britain's National Crime Agency is investigating a main financial backer of the campaign to get Britain out of the European Union over suspected illegal funding during the country's EU membership referendum, authorities said Thursday. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)
November 06, 2018 - 8:11 am
LONDON (AP) — Britain's data commissioner on Tuesday called for tougher rules governing the use of personal data by political campaigns around the world, declaring that recent investigations have shown a disturbing disregard for voters and their privacy. Speaking to the U.K. Parliament's media...
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November 06, 2018 - 5:32 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Tightening its control over popular anonymous chat apps, the Russian government has approved regulations that would identify users by their cellphone numbers. The measures signed Tuesday by Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev are part of Russia's moves to clamp down on smartphone messenger...
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FILE- In this April 12, 2016, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about the company's 10-year roadmap during the keynote address at the F8 Facebook Developer Conference in San Francisco. Instagram along with Messenger and WhatsApp are serving as the social media giant’s insurance policy for a future that might not be dominated by its flagship service. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
October 25, 2018 - 2:23 am
LONDON (AP) — British regulators on Thursday slapped Facebook with a fine of 500,000 pounds ($644,000) — the maximum possible — for failing to protect the privacy of its users in the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The Information Commissioner Office found that between 2007 and 2014, Facebook...
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