Botany

September 27, 2019 - 3:32 am
GENEVA (AP) — An international conservation group is warning that more than half of the trees in Europe that exist nowhere else in the world are threatened with extinction. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature says in their latest assessment of Europe's biodiversity that 58% of...
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September 19, 2019 - 8:20 am
The U.S. government will spend $3 million to find out if marijuana can relieve pain, but none of the money will be used to study the part of the plant that gets people high. Nine research grants announced Thursday are for work on CBD, the trendy ingredient showing up in cosmetics and foods, and...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Va. While once-endangered bald eagles are booming again in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall trajectory of endangered species and the federal act that protects them isn't so clearcut. (Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 10:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Monday rolled out some of the broadest changes in decades to enforcement of the landmark Endangered Species Act, allowing the government to put an economic cost on saving a species and other changes critics contend could speed extinction for some...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 2:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 11:30 a.m. A new United Nations science report on climate change says cutting down trees is making the world hotter and hungrier. Although the report doesn't pinpoint any country, scientists, when asked...
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FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2018 file photo, people walk in Tree Library park in Milan, Italy. The city has ambitious plans to plant 3 million new trees by 2030_ a move that experts say could offer relief to the city's muggy and sometimes tropical weather. A study released on Thursday, July 4, 2019 says that the most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees - a trillion of them, maybe more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
July 04, 2019 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees, a study says. A trillion of them, maybe more. And there's enough room, Swiss scientists say. Even with existing cities and farmland, there's enough space for new trees to cover 3.5 million square miles (9...
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FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2018 file photo, people walk in Tree Library park in Milan, Italy. The city has ambitious plans to plant 3 million new trees by 2030_ a move that experts say could offer relief to the city's muggy and sometimes tropical weather. A study released on Thursday, July 4, 2019 says that the most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees - a trillion of them, maybe more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
July 04, 2019 - 11:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A study says the best way to fight global warming is to plant a trillion trees — maybe more. Swiss scientists calculate that there's enough space to plant trees to cover 3.5 million square miles. That's roughly the size of the United States The study says those new trees could...
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FILE - This May 20, 2019 file photo shows marijuana plants in a grow room using green lights during their night cycle in Gardena, Calif. According to research released on Wednesday, June 12, 2019, archaeologists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of people smoking marijuana from a 2,500-year-old graveyard in western China. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
June 12, 2019 - 11:15 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Archaeologists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of people smoking marijuana from a 2,500-year-old graveyard in western China. In a complex of lofty tombs in the Pamir Mountains — a region near the borders of modern China, Pakistan and Tajikistan — excavators found 10...
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FILE - In this June 7, 2017, file photo, two wild elephants, part of a herd that arrived at a wetland near the Thakurkuchi railway station engage in a tussle on the outskirts of Gauhati, Assam, India. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/ Anupam Nath, File)
May 06, 2019 - 3:41 am
Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday in the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity. It's all because of humans, but it's not too late to fix the problem...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 8:25 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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In this July 27, 2018 photo, Susan Hewitt photographs a daisy-like weed known as 'shaggy soldier' and adds it to iNaturalist, the app she uses to participate in the New York City EcoFlora project. "If people could just take a few minutes to look at nature closely, I think they would be blown away," Hewitt said. Hundreds of New Yorkers are working with researchers to find and catalog wild plants in their city. They’re taking pictures with their smartphones as they walk the streets. Participants have already found invasive species, plants never documented before in New York City, and endangered native weeds. (AP Photo/Emiliano Rodriguez Mega)
August 03, 2018 - 7:01 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of New Yorkers are working with researchers to find and catalog wild plants in their city. They're taking pictures with their smartphones as they walk the streets. Since the project began last year, participants have found invasive species, plants never documented before in...
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