Agriculture and food technology

Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 20, 2019 - 10:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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The 2018 Nobel Chemistry laureate, Frances H. Arnold poses during the traditional Nobel Chair Signing ceremony at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, Sweden, on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018. (Claudio Brescian/TT via AP)
December 07, 2018 - 2:39 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field. Frances Arnold from the United States and Gregory Winter of Britain made the...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 1:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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This undated photo provided by the J.R. Simplot Company shows a sign outside the J.R. Simplot Company in Boise. Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. The company on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, announced the agreement with DowDuPont Inc. and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, developers of the nascent gene editing technology. (J.R. Simplot Company via AP)
August 06, 2018 - 10:44 am
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A multinational agricultural company based in Idaho has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and make grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. J.R. Simplot Company on...
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