Agricultural science

FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 2:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 11:30 a.m. A new United Nations science report on climate change says cutting down trees is making the world hotter and hungrier. Although the report doesn't pinpoint any country, scientists, when asked...
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FILE - This Monday, July 30, 2018 file photo shows rows of soybean plants in a field near Bennington, Neb. A report by the United Nations released on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019 says that human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the planet’s land, while the way people use the Earth is making global warming worse. The vicious cycle is already making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious, as well as cutting the number of species on Earth, according to a special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
August 08, 2019 - 2:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 11:15 a.m. A new United Nations science panel says that if the world eats less meat and more plant-based food it will help fight climate change. But scientists emphasize they aren't telling you what to...
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FILE - This Monday, July 30, 2018 file photo shows rows of soybean plants in a field near Bennington, Neb. A report by the United Nations released on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019 says that human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the planet’s land, while the way people use the Earth is making global warming worse. The vicious cycle is already making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious, as well as cutting the number of species on Earth, according to a special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
August 08, 2019 - 1:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new United Nations scientific report says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals. The report examines how global warming and land interact in a vicious cycle. Human-caused climate change is dramatically...
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FILE - In a Thursday, March 3, 2016 file photo, Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain sits in the Senate Finance Committee ahead of a hearing in Baton Rouge, La. Louisiana's first medical marijuana products are one step away from pharmacies, with final testing planned for this week. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain, whose department oversees the therapeutic cannabis program, said if the product collected Monday, July 29, 2019 from GB Sciences is free of contaminants, medical marijuana could reach patients early next week. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte, File)
August 01, 2019 - 5:43 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Medical marijuana is expected to start reaching select dispensaries in Louisiana on Tuesday, after the state agriculture department completed final testing and cleared therapeutic cannabis for release to patients. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain announced Thursday...
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FILE - In a Thursday, March 3, 2016 file photo, Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain sits in the Senate Finance Committee ahead of a hearing in Baton Rouge, La. Louisiana's first medical marijuana products are one step away from pharmacies, with final testing planned for this week. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain, whose department oversees the therapeutic cannabis program, said if the product collected Monday, July 29, 2019 from GB Sciences is free of contaminants, medical marijuana could reach patients early next week. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte, File)
August 01, 2019 - 5:37 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Medical marijuana is expected to start reaching select pharmacy shelves in Louisiana on Tuesday, after the state agriculture department completed final testing and cleared therapeutic cannabis for release to patients. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain announced Thursday...
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In this 2014 photo provided by the University of Mississippi, Dr. Suman Chandra inspects marijuana plants growing at the Ole Miss medicinal gardens in University, Miss. The plants are used for research under a contract from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The planned NIDA grow for 2019 will be divided between high THC and high CBD varieties with “recent interest (in CBD) as a potential medicine for a number of medical conditions,” NIDA said. (Robert Jordan/University of Mississippi via AP)
July 11, 2019 - 4:00 pm
The U.S. government is growing the largest crop of research marijuana in five years, responding to interest in varieties with high levels of THC and CBD. The government is the only source of pot for nearly all research in the U.S., while it still considers it illegal and dangerous. Scientists have...
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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 20, 2019 - 10:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration building behind FDA logos at a bus stop on the agency's campus in Silver Spring, Md. The Food and Drug Administration’s first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
June 03, 2019 - 5:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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March 21, 2019 - 8:44 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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FILE - In this Friday, Dec. 9, 2016 file photo, the Coca-Cola logo appears above the post where it trades on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. With obesity becoming a more pressing global problem, two January 2109 reports in science journals are calling for policies that limit industry influence and reviving debate about what role food companies should play in public health efforts. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
January 29, 2019 - 10:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The tweet from a group that finances development in Latin America was direct: Sodas do not offer beauty or joy, just a lot of sugar. There was one problem for the organization. Coca-Cola was a funder. The Inter-American Development Bank's management told Coke it hadn't been aware of...
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