Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., left, Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee departs with other House democrats after a caucus meeting, Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The Latest: Schiff says Trump's words enough to open inquiry

September 25, 2019 - 5:31 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump and the House impeachment inquiry (all times local):

8:10 a.m.

The House intelligence committee chairman says regardless of what a transcript of President Donald Trump's phone call with Ukraine's leader says, Trump himself has said plenty to warrant an impeachment inquiry.

Trump plans to release the transcript Wednesday. On Tuesday, Trump criticized House Democrats for opening an impeachment probe without seeing the transcript of the call.

Chairman Adam Schiff told "CBS This Morning" Wednesday that "what the president has said publicly is damning enough."

The impeachment probe focuses partly on whether Trump abused his presidential powers and sought help from Ukraine to undermine Democratic foe Joe Biden and investigate his son, Hunter Biden.

Trump has acknowledged temporarily freezing $400 million in military aid for Ukraine but denied it was leverage for information on the Bidens.

Schiff said national security is at risk "when the president would use military assistance to an ally as a cudgel."

Schiff says there's "no reason to wait" to see a whistleblower's complaint or a transcript of the call between Trump and Ukraine's president before starting the impeachment inquiry.

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12:15 a.m.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has launched a formal impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, yielding to mounting pressure from fellow Democrats and plunging a deeply divided nation into an election-year clash between Congress and the commander in chief.

The probe focuses partly on whether Trump abused his presidential powers and sought help from a foreign government to undermine Democratic foe Joe Biden and help his own reelection. Pelosi said Tuesday such actions would mark a "betrayal of his oath of office" and declared, "No one is above the law."

The impeachment inquiry, after months of investigations by House Democrats of the Trump administration, sets up the party's most direct and consequential confrontation with the president, injects deep uncertainty into the 2020 election campaign and tests anew the nation's constitutional system of checks and balances.