FILE - In this June 13, 2019, file photo, ExpressVote XL voting machines are displayed during a demonstration at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. More than one in ten voters could vote on paperless voting machines in the 2020 general election, according to a new analysis, leaving their ballots vulnerable to hacking according to a new study. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Analysis shows 2020 votes still vulnerable to hacking

August 13, 2019 - 3:00 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new analysis shows more than one in 10 voters could cast ballots on paperless voting machines in the 2020 general election, leaving their ballots vulnerable to hacking.

A study released by the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law on Tuesday evaluates the state of the country's election security six months before the New Hampshire primary and concludes that much more needs to be done.

While there has been significant progress by states and the federal government since Russian agents targeted U.S. state election systems ahead of the 2016 presidential election, the analysis notes that many states have not taken all of the steps needed to ensure that doesn't happen again.

Russia has denied interfering in the 2016 presidential election despite extensive evidence to the contrary.